Learning – The Real Reward

Mikhail Vasilyevich Nesterov - Natalia Nesterova on the garden bench, (1914). 
Plywood, oil, 107 x 97 cm.
The Museum of Russian Art, Kiev, Ukraine.

Mikhail Vasilyevich Nesterov – Natalia Nesterova on the garden bench, (1914). 
Plywood, oil, 107 x 97 cm.
The Museum of Russian Art, Kiev, Ukraine.

Knowledge Makes Everything Simpler

The real reward is learning. We learned to walk largely though trial and error. Not because daddy offered us $5. The reward was our own growth, something we’ve forgotten as we get older.

Learn to Live – Live to Learn

Russian artist and photographer Nikolai Tolsty composes ingenious photography shots with the help of paper and nature. He carefully cuts out animals’ silhouettes into a sheet of white paper and places them on top of colorful, and stunning backdrops

Russian artist and photographer Nikolai Tolsty composes ingenious photography shots with the help of paper and nature. He carefully cuts out animals’ silhouettes into a sheet of white paper and places them on top of colorful, and stunning backdrops

Three Ways to Prepare Children for Lifelong Learning

1. Ask Questions

Rather than giving answers, adults help children become lifelong learners by helping them identify questions that pique their curiosity. When we help young people make associations between what they are studying at school and the world outside of the classroom, they learn that everything in the universe is connected, that lifelong learning is an endless process.

2. Let Them Fail

Most adults know that learning occurs when we are willing to risk failure. But with today’s focus on high-stakes testing, many parents feel the need to protect their children and teens from setbacks and failure.

With caring and encouragement, adults can help young people use mistakes and failures to facilitate lifelong learning.

3. Give them Learning Experiences

Learning through experience, not just from books, is one of the best ways to give youth the skills they need for lifelong learning, living, and working in the 21st century. Particularly in the teen years, service-learning provides experiences that nurture critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and the ability to see the world as an interconnected community.

http://www.rootsofaction.com/is-lifelong-learning-in-your-childs-future/


“It is not that I’m so smart. But I stay with the questions much longer.” – Albert Einstein

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” – Benjamin Franklin

“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.” – Socrates

“We learn from failure, not from success!” – Bram Stoker

“Change is the end result of all true learning.” – Leo Buscaglia

“Learning is not child’s play; we cannot learn without pain.” – Aristotle

Sleep Disorders – To Sleep, Perchance to Dream

Vasily Perov (1833-82) Russian Realism

Vasily Perov (1833-82)
Russian Realism

HAMLET:
To be, or not to be: that is the question:Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to sufferThe slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;No more; and by a sleep to say we endThe heart-ache and the thousand natural shocksThat flesh is heir to, ’tis a consummationDevoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub;

image

6 Things No One Tells You About Sleepwalking

Sleepwalking

Sleep Apnea

Bedwetting

The Bed Wetting Store

Bedwetting

Summer Time Play

morning snack (2011)  nidhi chanani  everydayloveart

morning snack (2011)
nidhi chanani
everydayloveart

Play is essential to development because it contributes to the cognitive, physical, social, and emotional well-being of children and youth. Play also offers an ideal opportunity for parents to engage fully with their children.

Some of the benefits of free play discussed by the AAP include:

Opportunities to practice decision making skills.
Discovering their interests and passions.
Assuming adult roles where they can control outcomes and overcome fears.
Working with other children in groups.
Negotiating, decision-making and creating rules for games with their peers.
Promoting health through physical activity.
Reducing stress.
Learning the value of social bonds through interacting with other children.
Building self-confidence since they are in charge.
Learning self-direction (this may be the most valuable lesson children learn from free play).

The importance of play over the summer