Is Your Kid Hooked on Smartphones? 


More and more my patients are becoming addicted to their devices. I am concerned that their communication and social skills may be stifled. We are who we are in a large part by what we do. Children and adults who spend hours on devices miss opportunities and to grow as individuals. 

It is best to limit exposure to the internet and social media. There’s a false narrative of what’s real. Unfortunately it is not the curators of the net to assume that responsibility.  As parents and as families it is our role to take over responsibility. 


5 Tips for Parents


Keep devices out of kids’ bedrooms.

Set up online firewalls and data cutoffs.

Create a device contract. 

Model healthy device behaviors.

Consider old-school flip phones for your kids.

Taken from:  Is Your Kid Hooked on Smartphones? 5 Tips for Parents

Our minds can be hijacked’: the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia

Learning – Experience is your Best Teacher

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Curiosity

Curiosity is the ability to seek and acquire new knowledge, skills, and ways of understanding the world.

Curiosity facilitates engagement, critical thinking, and reasoning.

We nurture children’s curiosity and other life-long learning skills when we encourage them to identify and seek answers to questions that pique their interests.

Sociability

Sociability is the joyful, cooperative ability to engage with others. It derives from a collection of social-emotional skills that help children understand and express feelings and behaviors in ways that facilitate positive relationships, including active listening, self-regulation, and effective communication.

Resilience

Resilience is the ability to meet and overcome challenges in ways that maintain or promote well-being. It incorporates attributes like grit, persistence, initiative, and determination.

We build resilience when we push students gently to the edges of their comfort zones. Our encouragement as they take risks, overcome challenges, and grow from failure helps them learn to bounce back from life’s ups and downs.

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is the ability to examine and understand who we are relative to the world around us. It’s developed through skills like self-reflection. It’s situated at “true south” on the compass to symbolize that introspection is about looking into ourselves. Self-awareness impacts children’s capacity to see themselves as uniquely different from other people.

Integrity

Integrity is the ability to act consistently with the values, beliefs, and principles that we claim to hold. It’s about courage, honesty, and respect in one’s daily interactions — and doing the right thing even when no one is watching.

Resourcefulness

Resourcefulness is the ability to find and use available resources to achieve goals, problem solve, and shape the future. It draws on skills like planning, goal setting, strategic thinking, and organizing.

Creativity

Creativity is the ability to generate and communicate original ideas and appreciate the nature of beauty. It fosters imagination, innovation, and a sense of aesthetics.

Empathy

Empathy is the ability to recognize, feel, and respond to the needs and suffering of others. It facilitates the expression of caring, compassion, and kindness.

We influence children’s abilities to care for others beyond themselves by creating meaningful relationships with them, ensuring that they are seen, felt, and understood regardless of how they learn.

Pathways to Every Student’s Success

Picasso is sitting in the park, sketching. A woman walks by, recognizes him, runs up to him and pleads with him to draw her portrait. He’s in a good mood, so he agrees and starts sketching. A few minutes later, he hands her the portrait. The lady is ecstatic, she gushes about how wonderfully it captures the very essence of her character, what beautiful, beautiful work it is, and asks how much she owes him. “$5,000, madam,” says Picasso. The lady is taken aback, outraged, and asks how that’s even possible given it only took him 5 minutes. Picasso looks up and, without missing a beat, says: “No, madam, it took me my whole life.”

Picasso is sitting in the park, sketching. A woman walks by, recognizes him, runs up to him and pleads with him to draw her portrait. He’s in a good mood, so he agrees and starts sketching. A few minutes later, he hands her the portrait. The lady is ecstatic, she gushes about how wonderfully it captures the very essence of her character, what beautiful, beautiful work it is, and asks how much she owes him. “$5,000, madam,” says Picasso. The lady is taken aback, outraged, and asks how that’s even possible given it only took him 5 minutes. Picasso looks up and, without missing a beat, says: “No, madam, it took me my whole life.”

Learning – The Real Reward

Mikhail Vasilyevich Nesterov - Natalia Nesterova on the garden bench, (1914). 
Plywood, oil, 107 x 97 cm.
The Museum of Russian Art, Kiev, Ukraine.

Mikhail Vasilyevich Nesterov – Natalia Nesterova on the garden bench, (1914). 
Plywood, oil, 107 x 97 cm.
The Museum of Russian Art, Kiev, Ukraine.

Knowledge Makes Everything Simpler

The real reward is learning. We learned to walk largely though trial and error. Not because daddy offered us $5. The reward was our own growth, something we’ve forgotten as we get older.

Arguing – Take Your Ball and Go Home!

Jessie Willcox Smith (American, 1863 - 1935): Then the toddling baby boy (The Second Age)

Jessie Willcox Smith (American, 1863 – 1935): Then the toddling baby boy (The Second Age)

4 New Parenting Tips That Will Make Your Kids Awesome

Your stress isn’t just your stress — it’s their stress too. When you’re stressed out it hurts your children.

Seven out of ten young adults measure themselves against their parents in either their career or relationship

Arguing is the opposite of lying. Arguing is the way the kid decides not to lie

Children who spend time with their grandparent are more social, do better in school, show more concern for others.