Fragile – Conflict and Challenges are good for our Children!

 
“What doesn’t kill me makes me stronger.” Nietzsche was right, and Nasim Taleb’s book “Antifragile” explains why. Kids need thousands of hours of unsupervised play and thousands of conflicts and challenges that they resolve without adult help, in order to become independently functioning adults. But because of changes in American childrearing that began in the 1980s, and especially because of the helicopter parenting that took off in the 1990s for middle class and wealthy kids, they no longer get those experiences.Instead they are enmeshed in a “safety culture” that begins when they are young and that is now carried all the way through college. Books and words and visiting speakers are seen as “dangerous” and even as forms of “violence.” Trigger warnings and safe spaces are necessary to protect fragile young people from danger and violence. But such a culture is incompatible with political diversity, since many conservative ideas and speakers are labeled as threatening and banned from campus and the curriculum. Students who question the dominant political ethos are worn down by hostile reactions in the classroom. This is one of the core reasons why universities must choose one telos. Any institution that embraces safety culture cannot have the kind of viewpoint diversity that Mill advocated as essential in the search for truth.

Excerpted from:

Why Universities Must Choose One Telos: Truth or Social Justice

Polio New York – 1916

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New York City Polio Epidemic

Health officials announced a polio epidemic centered in Brooklyn, New York. As was typical with polio outbreaks, infections surfaced in the summer months.

More than 2000 people would die in New York City alone. Across the United States in 1916, polio took the lives of about 6,000 people, leaving thousands more paralyzed.

Summer epidemics would come to be common in this era and would lead to widespread closures of pools, amusements parks, and other places where children gathered.

Memorial Day – Less We Forget

My wife and I spent the morning at the National cemetery at the Memorial Day ceremony. An amazing event. 



Sands Of Kuwait 

Here I sit so far from my home

Here I sit with my thoughts alone

Thoughts of my kin, thoughts of my love

Thoughts of the hills and clouds above

No green can I see; all seems barren to me

No stream running by to a bountiful sea

No trees with their shade, no cool summer’s breeze

No soft words to cheer me

 

The sands of Kuwait stretch far from the eye

Here we shall live or here we shall die

So pray for us all, my comrades and me

That we may return safe back home to thee

Our thoughts are with you, our loved ones at home

But here for a while the sands we must roam

A boundless expanse – no end can I see

As boundless my dear as my love for you

 

I recall when first we met

At the fair on that warm summer day

Your eyes so bright, your hair flowing free

A smile full of joy and laughter so gay

A heart full of care wherever you go

A heart ever true whene’er I must roam

Fate smiled on me then, oh smile once again

And lead me back home

 

The sands of Kuwait stretch far from the eye

Here we shall live or here we shall die

So pray for us all, my comrades and me

That we may return safe back home to thee

Our thoughts are with you, our loved ones at home

But here for a while the sands we must roam

A boundless expanse – no end can I see

As boundless my dear as my love for you

 
The White Table – A Remembrance to Our POW/MIAs

Summer Time Play

morning snack (2011)  nidhi chanani  everydayloveart

morning snack (2011)
nidhi chanani
everydayloveart

Play is essential to development because it contributes to the cognitive, physical, social, and emotional well-being of children and youth. Play also offers an ideal opportunity for parents to engage fully with their children.

Some of the benefits of free play discussed by the AAP include:

Opportunities to practice decision making skills.
Discovering their interests and passions.
Assuming adult roles where they can control outcomes and overcome fears.
Working with other children in groups.
Negotiating, decision-making and creating rules for games with their peers.
Promoting health through physical activity.
Reducing stress.
Learning the value of social bonds through interacting with other children.
Building self-confidence since they are in charge.
Learning self-direction (this may be the most valuable lesson children learn from free play).

The importance of play over the summer