Education – What happens after High School ?

The true function of philosophy is to educate us in the principles of reasoning and not to put an end to further reasoning by the introduction of fixed conclusions.

George Henry Lewes Quote

First answer. I don’t know.

College isn’t for everyone. It can be an insurmountable burden from which you may not recoup your investment. A technical trade or an apprenticeship may afford a person with the opportunity to mature and achieve some degree of financial responsibility. It would give them a chance to find mentors in areas of interest. Just as a general education will give one good overall view of the world past and present.

College is not the place to go to find yourself. To a large extent you must know yourself prior to going into the unknown.

Just like a cook does prep work before preparing a dinner or a builder makes plans, drafts blueprints subcontracts with his subs before he digs his footings.

Children need a good foundation, direction and redirecting.

Letting a student find himself in college like pre 1970 may have worked then. I am not sure it works now.

I liked the following article.

I enjoyed my liberal arts studies particularly history and political science. But I think my best education was high school. However mentoring was lacking there.

In college I found mentors in physics and cytology as well as french. By that I mean teachers of whom I asked help.

Tell you children to ask questions and seek mentors who are more successful and experienced. Don’t be intimidated by another’s success.

” Throughout his­tory it has been com­mon for peo­ple to study sub­jects with no im­me­di­ate re­la­tion­ship to their in­tended pro­fes­sions. In an­tiq­uity, ed­u­cation was in­tended to en­rich stu­dents’ lives. Prag­matic ben­e­fits such as rhetor­i­cal abil­ity, log­i­cal rea­son­ing and busi­ness skills were wel­come byprod­ucts of a good ed­u­ca­tion. The phrase “lib­eral arts” comes from the Latin word lib­er­alis, mean­ing “wor­thy of a free per­son.” A lib­eral-arts ed­u­ca­tion gives some­one the free­dom to par­tic­i­pate fully in civic life.

We should up­date the lib­eral arts to take into con­sid­er­a­tion the re­al­i­ties of the mod­ern world. Soft­ware per­me­ates nearly every­thing. All stu­dents, no mat­ter their ma­jor, should de­velop a ba­sic fa­mil­iar­ity with cod­ing tool sets such as true-false state­ments, also called “Booleans,” and if-then or con­di­tional state­ments.

But coders gain, too, from study­ing the lib­eral arts. “The value of an ed­u­ca­tion in a lib­eral arts col­lege,” said Al­bert Ein­stein, “is not the learn­ing of many facts but the train­ing of the mind to think some­thing that can­not be learned from text­books.” Con­struct­ing ar­gu­ments based on his­tor­i­cal ev­i­dence or study­ing rhetoric to im­prove one’s abil­ity to per­suade an au­di­ence has ob­vi­ous ap-plications. Interdisciplinary ap­proaches to solv­ing prob­lems are cru­cial to address­ing mod­ern chal­lenges such as cul­ti­vat­ing re­la­tion­ships in an in­creas­ingly digi­tal world and cre­atively in­te­grat­ing new tech­nolo­gies into dif­fer­ent sec­tors of the econ­omy.

So when par­ents ask them­selves “What course of study will help my child get a job?” they shouldn’t think only about how the work-force op­er­ates to­day but how it will op­er­ate 10 or 20 years down the road. Though no one knows for sure ex­actly what the land­scape will look like, we can be cer­tain that crit­i­cal think­ing will still have value. And in that world, so will a lib­eral-arts de­gree. “

Excerpted from:

If You Want Your Child to Succeed, Don’t Sell Liberal Arts Short

Education – Drive, Desire, Dedication, Determination 


Dr. Phoebe Chapple
The principal goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done; men and women who are creative, inventive and discoverers, who can be critical and verify, and not accept, everything they are offered. -Jean Piaget, psychologist (9 Aug 1896-1980) 

Learning – Experience is your Best Teacher

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Curiosity

Curiosity is the ability to seek and acquire new knowledge, skills, and ways of understanding the world.

Curiosity facilitates engagement, critical thinking, and reasoning.

We nurture children’s curiosity and other life-long learning skills when we encourage them to identify and seek answers to questions that pique their interests.

Sociability

Sociability is the joyful, cooperative ability to engage with others. It derives from a collection of social-emotional skills that help children understand and express feelings and behaviors in ways that facilitate positive relationships, including active listening, self-regulation, and effective communication.

Resilience

Resilience is the ability to meet and overcome challenges in ways that maintain or promote well-being. It incorporates attributes like grit, persistence, initiative, and determination.

We build resilience when we push students gently to the edges of their comfort zones. Our encouragement as they take risks, overcome challenges, and grow from failure helps them learn to bounce back from life’s ups and downs.

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is the ability to examine and understand who we are relative to the world around us. It’s developed through skills like self-reflection. It’s situated at “true south” on the compass to symbolize that introspection is about looking into ourselves. Self-awareness impacts children’s capacity to see themselves as uniquely different from other people.

Integrity

Integrity is the ability to act consistently with the values, beliefs, and principles that we claim to hold. It’s about courage, honesty, and respect in one’s daily interactions — and doing the right thing even when no one is watching.

Resourcefulness

Resourcefulness is the ability to find and use available resources to achieve goals, problem solve, and shape the future. It draws on skills like planning, goal setting, strategic thinking, and organizing.

Creativity

Creativity is the ability to generate and communicate original ideas and appreciate the nature of beauty. It fosters imagination, innovation, and a sense of aesthetics.

Empathy

Empathy is the ability to recognize, feel, and respond to the needs and suffering of others. It facilitates the expression of caring, compassion, and kindness.

We influence children’s abilities to care for others beyond themselves by creating meaningful relationships with them, ensuring that they are seen, felt, and understood regardless of how they learn.

Pathways to Every Student’s Success

Picasso is sitting in the park, sketching. A woman walks by, recognizes him, runs up to him and pleads with him to draw her portrait. He’s in a good mood, so he agrees and starts sketching. A few minutes later, he hands her the portrait. The lady is ecstatic, she gushes about how wonderfully it captures the very essence of her character, what beautiful, beautiful work it is, and asks how much she owes him. “$5,000, madam,” says Picasso. The lady is taken aback, outraged, and asks how that’s even possible given it only took him 5 minutes. Picasso looks up and, without missing a beat, says: “No, madam, it took me my whole life.”

Picasso is sitting in the park, sketching. A woman walks by, recognizes him, runs up to him and pleads with him to draw her portrait. He’s in a good mood, so he agrees and starts sketching. A few minutes later, he hands her the portrait. The lady is ecstatic, she gushes about how wonderfully it captures the very essence of her character, what beautiful, beautiful work it is, and asks how much she owes him. “$5,000, madam,” says Picasso. The lady is taken aback, outraged, and asks how that’s even possible given it only took him 5 minutes. Picasso looks up and, without missing a beat, says: “No, madam, it took me my whole life.”

Learning – The Real Reward

Mikhail Vasilyevich Nesterov - Natalia Nesterova on the garden bench, (1914). 
Plywood, oil, 107 x 97 cm.
The Museum of Russian Art, Kiev, Ukraine.

Mikhail Vasilyevich Nesterov – Natalia Nesterova on the garden bench, (1914). 
Plywood, oil, 107 x 97 cm.
The Museum of Russian Art, Kiev, Ukraine.

Knowledge Makes Everything Simpler

The real reward is learning. We learned to walk largely though trial and error. Not because daddy offered us $5. The reward was our own growth, something we’ve forgotten as we get older.

Learn to Live – Live to Learn

Russian artist and photographer Nikolai Tolsty composes ingenious photography shots with the help of paper and nature. He carefully cuts out animals’ silhouettes into a sheet of white paper and places them on top of colorful, and stunning backdrops

Russian artist and photographer Nikolai Tolsty composes ingenious photography shots with the help of paper and nature. He carefully cuts out animals’ silhouettes into a sheet of white paper and places them on top of colorful, and stunning backdrops

Three Ways to Prepare Children for Lifelong Learning

1. Ask Questions

Rather than giving answers, adults help children become lifelong learners by helping them identify questions that pique their curiosity. When we help young people make associations between what they are studying at school and the world outside of the classroom, they learn that everything in the universe is connected, that lifelong learning is an endless process.

2. Let Them Fail

Most adults know that learning occurs when we are willing to risk failure. But with today’s focus on high-stakes testing, many parents feel the need to protect their children and teens from setbacks and failure.

With caring and encouragement, adults can help young people use mistakes and failures to facilitate lifelong learning.

3. Give them Learning Experiences

Learning through experience, not just from books, is one of the best ways to give youth the skills they need for lifelong learning, living, and working in the 21st century. Particularly in the teen years, service-learning provides experiences that nurture critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and the ability to see the world as an interconnected community.

http://www.rootsofaction.com/is-lifelong-learning-in-your-childs-future/


“It is not that I’m so smart. But I stay with the questions much longer.” – Albert Einstein

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” – Benjamin Franklin

“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.” – Socrates

“We learn from failure, not from success!” – Bram Stoker

“Change is the end result of all true learning.” – Leo Buscaglia

“Learning is not child’s play; we cannot learn without pain.” – Aristotle