Geocentrism – Heliocentrism – Big Bang

Michelangelo, Creation of Adam, from the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican, Rome, 1508-1512, fresco

Michelangelo, Creation of Adam, from the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican, Rome, 1508-1512, fresco

The most famous section of the Sistine Chapel ceiling is Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam

The Bible is not a scientific textbook and doesn’t claim to be. Science is not the sole arbiter of truth, and that our biblical interpretation is about learning to live within the narrative of the Scripture, to let God’s story become our story

Many families stay people of faith but are no longer allied with a faith community. It is hard to align what many perceive as a discongruency with theology and science.

Those disparities have been present since prehistory. The most noteworthy was during the renaissance when Galileo was placed under house arrest because of his scientific theory of the heliocentricity of our universe. It was not in accord with church thought on “the Aristotelian theory of” geocentrism. In many ways that is where we are today. with fundamentalist theism versus science: e.g. the Hubble theory of the ever-expanding universe.”Big Bang”

Early Astronomers: Ptolemy, Aristotle, Copernicus, and Galileo

In retrospect neither view is important to our immediate families who may be suffering illness or loss. Many are struggling from day-to-day.

I do not know how to comfort those families except through compassion and listening. Most seek out friends or family. Others reach out to their faith communities. Some return to the faith of their childhood. Others who may not have had some faith-based upbringing may despair and self medicate with drugs or alcohol.

Many societies both Western and Eastern have been elevated by faith. My feeling is that those societies that are trending more secular will continue to deteriorate.

Individuals may have distorted principles of faith to suit their personal gain but using your personal faith as the ego-center of your universe will in turn be more fulfilling.

I urge my families in need to not be afraid to reach out during times of need: through counseling, through exercise, continued pursuit of activities that they may find rewarding and fulfilling.

We all want to make a difference but we need to encourage our families that everything that they do is important, to always take a step forward, and not be too anxious or fearful.

Do not be overwhelmed by the big picture.

Intricate spiral arms contain areas of new star formation in this dusty galaxy. This galaxy, which lies about 100 million light-years away, toward the direction of the constellation Leo, was home to a supernova that appeared in 1994.

Intricate spiral arms contain areas of new star formation in this dusty galaxy. This galaxy, which lies about 100 million light-years away, toward the direction of the constellation Leo, was home to a supernova that appeared in 1994.

Chaplain’s Corner: No Atheists in Foxholes: Chaplains Gave All in World War II”

By Lt. Col. Kenneth Reyes

Many have heard the familiar phrase, “There is no such thing as an atheist in a fox hole.”

Where did this come from?

Research I verified in an interview with former World War II prisoner of war Roy Bodine (my friend) indicates the phrase has been credited to Father William Cummings.

As the story goes, Father Cummings was a civilian missionary Catholic priest in the Philippines.

The phrase was coined during the Japanese attack at Corregidor.

During the siege, Cummings had noticed non-Catholics were attending his services.

Some he knew were not Catholic, some were not religious and some were even known atheists.

Life-and-death experiences prompt a reality check.

Even the strongest of beliefs can change, and, I may add, can go both ways – people can be drawn to or away from “faith.”

With the pending surrender of allied forces to the Japanese, Cummings uttered the famous phrase “There is no such thing as an atheist in a fox hole.”

In one of my many discussions with Roy, he distinctly remembered a period on the “Hell Ships” – these were ships the Japanese used to bring POWs from the Philippines back to Japan.

They were unmarked and thus ‘fair game’ for attacks from the allies from the air and sea.

Of the 3,000-plus POWs listed on the ships, only 180 survived the journey.

“When our own planes were attacking us,” Roy said, “I remember Father Cummings calming us down by reciting the Lord’s Prayer and offering up prayers on our behalf.

For a brief moment I did not hear the yells and screams of dying men as our boat was attacked by our own men.”

He went on to say, “There was a peaceful quiet during the attack that I cannot explain nor have experienced since.”

Later on during the trip to Japan, Cummings, after giving his food to others who needed it more, succumbed to his own need and died of starvation.

Everyone expresses some form of faith every day, whether it is religious or secular.

Some express faith by believing when they get up in the morning they will arrive at work in one piece, thankful they have been given another opportunity to enjoy the majesty of the day; or express relief the doctor’s results were negative.

The real question is, “Is it important to have faith in ‘faith’ itself or is it more important to ask, ‘What is the object of my faith?’”

Roy never affirmed or expressed whether his faith was rooted in religion or not, but for a moment in time on the “Hell Ships,” he believed in Cummings’ faith.

What is the root or object of your faith?

Is it something you can count on in times of plenty or loss; peace or chaos; joy or sorrow; success or failure?

Is it something you can count on in times of plenty or loss; peace or chaos; joy or sorrow; success or failure?

What is ‘faith’ to you?

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